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Tribeca Film Festival 2017 Interview: Bryan Buckley (Director/Writer) and Barkhad Abdi ( Actor) – Dabka

Tribeca Film Festival 2017 Interview: Bryan Buckley (Director/Writer) and Barkhad Abdi ( Actor) – Dabka

‘Dabka” tells the story of Canadian wanna-be journalist Jay (Evan Peters), who after an encounter with his journalist idol (Al Pacino) goes to Somalia to try to capture a unique story of the unraveled Pirates situation in the country’s coast. When naive young journalist arrives in the country, in 2008 the cargo vessel MV Faina

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2017 Tribeca Film Festival Interview: Amit V Masurkar (Newton)

“Newton” delivers a dark comedy about the vulnerable nature of Democracy and it’s execution. India, the world’s largest democracy, is preparing for an election. With more than 800 million voters, this is a logistical puzzle of epic proportions. Newton is an idealistic young office clerk volunteering to be a poll worker. He’s keen to put

Violent-Young-Men Movies: “The Dinner,” “Sweet Virginia,” “Super Dark Times,” and “The Gray State”

The fresh batch of films coming out of Tribeca2017 seems to have a violent teenage psychopaths every time you turn around. What turns our young men into crazy killers? At the same time as a slew of documentaries and true-life tales are depicting the courage and moral fortitude of actual young men around the world, responding to terrorism and war with bravery – going to extraordinary lengths to save lives, we get a bunch of “thriller” films that depict American young men as narcissistic psychopaths who revel in bloody violence. On one hand there is City of Ghosts, Dabka, and When God Sleeps, for starters – peace-seeking films, and on the other is The Dinner, Super Dark Times, Sweet Virginia, and even The Gray State. Is there a cultural connection?

“Get Me Roger Stone” Film Review: Get Your Hate On!

Hey, all you angry progressive liberals, this is your film – to engage your rage. Hey, all you angry lovers of noble and decent democracy, this is your film – to reinforce your sense of injustice. Hey all you morally conscious idealists who imagine a level political field and fair play, get ready to get your hate on! And ALSO all you Republicans, and Libertarians, and you stubborn Trump-defenders: this film is full of quotable, self-satisfying defenses sure to infuriate your naïve, liberal friends who love to hate on you. There is something for every political animal in this movie. And animal may be the key word in that sentence.

“Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives” Review — That’s Entertainment!

The opening night film at Tribeca Film Festival 2017: Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives, directed by Chris Perkel – in his directorial debut. The new film premiered at Madison Square Garden, followed by a live performance by several of the musical greats featured in the film – Aretha Franklin, Jennifer Hudson, Earth Wind & Fire, Barry Manilow, Carly Simon, and Dionne Warwick. Quite a splashy opening for “downtown” Tribeca. First question is always: Why is this the opening night film and is it justified? I have previously found fault with such choices, because they are often made with profit-making motives taking precedence over artistic merit or relevance of subject, but in this case, I am surprised to report: Yes, this was a good choice, and worthy.

“Take Me” and “Hounds of Love” Film Reviews: Blondes-Bound-in-Basement Movies

There are two films I’ve seen so far at TribecaFilm Festival 2017 that have very significant similarities – they both center around a pretty blonde woman getting kidnapped, tied up, stuffed into someone’s basement, and abused. Both are also directorial debuts, btw. One is called Hounds of Love, an Australian drama written and directed by Ben Young. The other is called Take Me, an American film written by Mike Makowsky and directed by Pat Healy (who also plays the leading role). That movie lets the audience figure out if it is a crime thriller or a slapstick farce.

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