festival articles

Dispatches From Sundance Film Festival 2020: Part 3

Dispatches From Sundance Film Festival 2020: Part 3

Indiewood/Hollywoodn’t film critic Jake Kring-Schreifels has been keeping a regular diary over the course of the 2020 Sundance Film Festival. In his third and final dispatch, Jake shares a range of musings along with seven film reviews. This article offers Jake’s take-away impressions of the festival in Park City, from streaming to shrieking. Jake begins his pondering with a report on The Last Thing He Wanted and Wendy, two Netflix made-for-streaming flicks. Then his experience is buoyed by Minari — an unexpected gem and evidence that festival surprises still exist. As he discusses Horse Girl and Lost Girls, Jake contemplates the importance of actors.. Finishing his week with Us Kids and The Night House, Jake is reminded that despite so many of these films’ online destinations, festivals still offer the thrill of a shared audience experience, sitting in the dark with strangers in a big theater.

Dispatches From Sundance Film Festival 2020: Part 2

Indiewood/Hollywoodn’t film critic Jake Kring-Schreifels is keeping a regular diary over the course of a week at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival, and this is his second dispatch. Jake’s giving our IndieNYC website a Sundance first-look, writing about the movies he’s seeing, his observations around Park City and the excitement surrounding another year of new independent cinema. Today’s report includes: Never Rarely Sometimes Always, Eliza Hittman’s new drama; Worth, a Michael Keaton-led legal procedural; Dream Horse, an uplifting racehorse saga; and Promising Young Woman, a feminist revenge thriller starring Carrie Mulligan. See which film Jake calls “the best thing I’ve seen at the festival.” (And look for some movie trailers at the end of this article.)

Dispatches From Sundance Film Festival 2020: Part 1

Indiewood/Hollywoodn’t film critic Jake Kring-Schreifels is keeping a regular diary over the course of a week at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival. He’s giving our IndieNYC website a Sundance first-look, writing about the movies he’s seeing, his observations around Park City and the excitement surrounding another year of new independent cinema. Check back to IndieNYC throughout the festival for his latest entries from Park City. Today’s report includes the new Taylor Swift documentary Miss Americana, Luxor from director Zeina Durr, La Llorona by Jayro Bustamente and Ironbark by Dominic Cooke.

“Slay the Dragon” Documentary Review / Interview with Barak Goodman and Chris Durrance

This review, originally written in May 2019 has been reposted in Jan 2020 for the screening of the “Slay the Dragon” documentary at the NYC CineMatters Social Justice Film Festival. Please pardon the dated TV references, but the gerrymandering issue is more urgent than ever as we approach the 2020 elections.

When Lambs Become Lions, Tribeca documentary

Film Review: “When Lambs Become Lions” vs “The Elephant Queen”

You have two choices. You’re very unlikely to watch two documentaries about elephants in the next few months. There is The Elephant Queen, which features “magnificent images of majestic animals” and follows a herd of elephants across the Kenyan savanna. By all accounts, that film is gorgeously shot, poignantly narrated and is an inspiring tribute to the power of motherhood. OR, if you want more from your movie than pretty shots of elephants at sunset as they run in slow motion across the plains, you could watch When Lambs Become Lions by Jon Kasbe, a brilliant documentary centered around African elephant poaching, which Helen Highly Recommends – what every documentary aspires to be.

"Scandalous," the National Enquirer documentary

“Scandalous: The Untold Story of the National Enquirer” Review: Sexy, Smart and Shocking

With his new documentary, “Scandalous: The Untold Story of the National Enquirer,” director Mark Landsman delves into the incredible yet accurate story of the most infamous newspaper in US history, detailing its wild history and its surprising, continuing role in shaping what the news has become and what the enquiring public wants to know. Helen Highly Recommends this film as the timely cure for what ails us all right now as a nation – just the right, ironic cocktail of sexy, smart and shocking, with a cancerous red-dye-number-2 maraschino-cherry garnish.

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